A neat observation from one of the staff physicists at the Exploratorium:

Here is a little game to play with farsighted and nearsighted glasses. Ask all your students who wear glasses to put them on and stand up. Walk up to each of them, look into their eyes and you will be able to tell them if they are nearsighted or farsighted.

If they are farsighted (and therefore have convex lenses) you will see the contour of their cheeks move OUT when viewed through their glasses. If they are nearsighted (and therefore have concave lenses) you will see the contour of their cheeks move IN when viewed through their glasses. This is a nice opportunity for a ray diagram or two! Astigmatism, graded lenses and bifocals can make this more difficult, but it is fun to try. The stronger the prescription the better. Holding far and nearsighted glasses up to colored lights or shadows also produces discriminating effects.

This could be a great “nature of science” activity! Tell them you have mystical powers and can see the shape of their retina (or some such garbage) just by looking deeply into their eyes. (Of course, it won’t work with any students who wear contacts!  Why not? Can they guess how you do it?)

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